I take many different probiotics for my general health but this is the one that is always on my shelf! Saccharomyces Boulardii capsules (SBC) are my staple during Ulcerative Colitis flare ups and they keep me healthy during remissions. I’ve noticed a significant change for the better in my …ahem… bowel movements since I started taking these and I recommend them to anyone with digestive issues. Seriously though, (insert happy poop emoticon) 

I take many different probiotics for my general health but this is the one that is always on my shelf! Saccharomyces Boulardii capsules (SBC) are my staple during Ulcerative Colitis flare ups and they keep me healthy during remissions. I’ve noticed a significant change for the better in my …ahem… bowel movements since I started taking these and I recommend them to anyone with digestive issues. Seriously though, (insert happy poop emoticon) 

So I ate gluten…

…after 1.5 years being gluten free. It’s such a silly story though. 

On Sunday (2 days ago) I decided last minute that I was going to go my my fiance’s basketball games to support him as a new coach. I forgot my snack and ended up getting really hungry. It wasn’t until after we were done with the games that I realized I hadn’t eaten since my smoothie in the morning (it was 4pm at this point.) On our way home I was on the edge of hangry and mentioned we should go to Red Robin so I could inhale some bottomless fries while eating a gluten free burger and slurp on a milkshake. This is obviously not my everyday kind of meal, but my starving self was super excited and ready to inhale food. 

I didn’t realize until halfway through my burger that I forgot to order it with a gluten free bun!!!! Are you kidding me?! I haven’t eaten gluten in a year in a half and I just ate half a burger. wow. I didn’t know what to do with myself. I was a little scared at what kind of mess it was going to make with my insides so I went home, drank peppermint tea with a ton of water and waited it out. 

Yesterday (the next day) I felt really tired, slept almost 12 hours through the night and took another 2 hour nap later in the day. I felt super foggy and tripped over my words a lot while teaching. 

Today I am achey, my scoliosis especially hurts. But I’m not surprised because since I have a severe intolerance (not celiac) to gluten it would increase inflammation within my body and I would feel all those little aches and pains, like I have been. 

Luckily my Ulcerative Colitis was already totally under control and in a healthy state of remission so my digestion didn’t go haywire. If I was in flare though, whoa that would be another story. 

So now I’m just eating as clean and healthy as I possibly can, shaking my head at such a silly mistake, and picking up my life like it never happened. Thankfully the reaction was minimal. I much prefer my life gluten free though. 

Have any of you guys accidentally eaten gluten? 

Revamped my blog

finally! 

I’m pleased, very pleased. I rearranged the links and created a few of my favorite topics so it will be easier to navigate my blog. 

  • Ask - I do my best to answer ;) I’ll get better at that! 
  • YouTube - Direct link 
  • Facebook - Direct link
  • Instagram - Direct link
  • Yoga - All things yoga: yoga practice, yoga tips, yogic lifestyle, yoga philosophy, yoga, yoga, yoda
  • Health - Raw, paleo, clean eating, fitness, mental health, physical health, health tips, motivation, inspiration, how I quit smoking etc. 
  • Ulcerative Colitis - Because I was diagnosed at 8, went med/steroid free at 18, healed a couple flares naturally since and documented some that journey 
  • Me - Personal posts

This blog started as a modeling page because that’s one of the things I did before I was a yoga teacher. I quit modeling when I moved to Colorado and have only done a couple select photo shoots since. 

So what do you guys think? Better? I’m way open to feedback :) 

-SB

No more coffee. Daily yoga practice. Photoshoot.

Last weekend I decided to quit coffee and take AM yoga classes instead to help with my recent UC flare. I’ve taken 1 class a day since at One Yoga Denver and CorePower Yoga and I feel incredible! I’m driving to the studio before I even know what’s going on and end up “waking up” on my mat. I end up walking out of the studio more energized and more productive than coffee could ever do for me! It feels so much better energizing my body from the inside out than the outside in. 

Now I’m packing to leave for MN for a fitness photoshoot for Life Time Fitness which means I’ll be bringing my mat and a “home practice” with me  In the meantime, it’s never too late to start a daily practice! Doesn’t have to be an hour long, or in a studio. Just make an effort to get on your mat for a few deeps breaths every day and watch as your practice, day, and life transform 

Paleo, low FODMAPs, Ulcerative Colitis and Myself

The paleo, low FODMAPS diet I’ve been doing for my most recent Ulcerative Colitis flare is really working! Some of the more uncomfortable symptoms started going away within a week. I’ve been doing it for a little over a month and I’m healing fast! When I go a week without the UC symptoms I will consider this flare healed. I’m so happy :) I’m almost there!

"The diet restricts foods such as grains, beans, dairy products, salt, sugar, potatoes or any type of food that agricultural development helped create. Grains, dairy products and beans have a high lectin content. Lectins contain toxic compounds designed to ward off insect attacks. Paleo diet supporters believe that lectins may also attack the human body. Lectins, says Cordain, have a carbohydrate and a protein component. The protein component resembles proteins in the human body. Your immune system attacks lectins when they escape your bowels. After the attack, it memorizes the lectin structure in the same way that a police officer memorizes the face of a frequent perpetrator.

Paleo diet proponents believe that lectin’s similarity to your body’s natural proteins make people susceptible to ulcerative colitis and other inflammatory bowel diseases. Your immune system is intelligent, but it in people with ulcerative colitis, it is not smart enough to distinguish between your body’s own proteins and the lectin. It, therefore, attacks your body’s cells in the same way it attacked the lectin. An autoimmune response ensues, causing leaky gut and other common symptoms of ulcerative colitis. Read more.”

It’s been a little tricky maintaining this very clean, but limited, diet. But I’m still coming from my raw mindset and keeping as many raw fruits and vegetables in my diet as possible so I can get some living enzymes. It’s nice because I get to eat all my wonderful produce and I’m getting ample protein from the meat in my new diet! I don’t miss the grains but the chocolate cravings are pretty strong ;) It’s all worth it when this flare is over. Eventually I’ll start adding in the FODMAPs foods one by one but I’m going to continue Paleo and I’m so excited. 

Looked up the tag “Ulcerative Colitis”…

and damn! Everyone is so negative! Yes, UC and Crohns are painful and exhausting diseases but I’ve found that maintaining a positive outlook has helped me the most. 

The words “chronically ill” just don’t resinate with me. Yes, I have an autoimmune disease and I deal with symptoms and flares that some people refer to as “humiliating and crippling” but I just refuse to look at it that way. I’m happier and healthier than I’ve ever been, I’ve accepted my body and I’m finding more and more ways to become healthier and better everyday. I’m even in the middle of a flare up right now. My goal is to heal this flare up before I leave for Colorado but I’m not going to stress over it. I’m doing my best to eat healthy and to bring my body into a healing alkaline state so that this flare can pass. It will take longer to heal than if I took a magical prednisone (steroid) prescription but I prefer to treat the cause, not the symptoms. Also, I hate what those meds do to my body, let’s not pump me full of chemicals if we don’t have to. 

I “suffered” from the disease for over 13 years before I decided enough was enough. I weaned myself off my meds  & steroids and started experimenting with my diet, exercise, and outlook. I spent the last 5-6 years experimenting and taking note of my “food sensitivities.” As of the last 3 years, this is what I do: 

When I’m not in flare:

  • Mostly raw & whole food diet, able to experiment into cooked foods, even meat and dairy (minimal)
  • Stay away from trigger foods: Highly processed, fried anything, nuts with shells, etc.
  • Daily workouts - no restrictions on working out or styles of workouts 
  • Daily yoga - to help manage stress & maintain a healthy body/circulation
  • Happy

When I’m in flare:

  • 100% raw food diet (no raw nuts, peels) + juicing daily
  • NO meat or dairy, exception for raw milk (raw milk has been very healing for me)
  • Daily yoga - to manage stress and keep me active
  • Restricted workouts, depends on my energy level. 
  • Daily: Raw honey, Raw coconut oil, Aloe vera juice, chia seed, raw sauerkraut, juiced cabbage, raw milk (when available)
  • Happy

If a flare up gets really bad:

  • 100% raw food diet with juice fasting to deliver much needed nutrients while giving my colon a break. 
  • Daily yoga & walking only, no other forms of workouts. My body needs to reserve energy for healing
  • Daily: Raw honey, Raw coconut oil, Aloe vera juice, chia seed, raw sauerkraut, juiced cabbage, raw milk 
  • Acupuncture 1-2x week
  • Happy

This works for me. I’m not recommending anyone go off their medicine or slap their doctors… I’m just putting it out there that you can find relief, it may be risky and uncomfortable but there is such a thing as natural healing. Sure, I still go through the occasional flare up but consider this:

When I was on Asacol/pentasa + steroids and following the diet the doctors recommended I was flaring an average of 4x a year. It seemed like I was constantly sick. Ever since I got off my meds and followed my own natural healing path I’ve had an average of flaring once every 2+ years. 

I have to thank my loving boyfriend for supporting me and encouraging me along this natural healing path. My family accepts me for who I am and they do a great job supporting me, especially around the dinner table. I really appreciate that I have such a strong support system especially because my methods seem odd to some, even wrong in most western doctors’ standards. But my results speak for themselves, and it’s my disease I’ll decide how I want to treat it.